About Us

Welcome – get to know us and our history.

 
 
 
 
 
 

WHO WE ARE

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center is a 373 bed facility staffed by more than 4,000 dedicated individuals located in the South Bay area of Los Angeles. Harbor-UCLA is a public teaching hospital that is well known for its academic excellence and commitment to disadvantaged communities in Los Angeles.

A key to Harbor-UCLA’s ability to attract and retain many outstanding, experienced faculty physicians as well as to draw top residency candidates is its partnership with Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed).

Harbor-UCLA has been affiliated with the UCLA School of Medicine since 1951. Today, the medical center is an important training ground with more than 300 full-time faculty physicians – all with a teaching appointment with UCLA’s School of Medicine — and 120 part-time faculty physicians, and 360 volunteer faculty physicians.

Harbor-UCLA attracts hundreds of top medical school graduates from across the nation each year. Because many of its graduating Resident Physicians and Fellows stay locally to practice medicine, Harbor-UCLA’s training programs are a continual and important source of new medical expertise for Southland communities.

A key to Harbor-UCLA’s ability to attract and retain many outstanding, experienced faculty physicians as well as to draw top residency candidates is its partnership with Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed). This collaboration has resulted in the modern cholesterol test, important contributions to treatments for aneurisms, cancer, infectious diseases, pulmonary disorders, and other conditions, as well major clinical discoveries in perinatal, vaccine, and women’s care research.



HISTORY

For the past fifty years the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center has served the southwestern community of Los Angeles County. The original facility opened in 1943 as a U.S. Army station hospital.

In 1946 the U.S. Army sold the entire facility as war surplus to the Los Angeles County Department of Charities and became known as Harbor General Hospital when the county took over in 1946. The county later formed a partnership with UCLA / Geffen School of Medicine, which continues to run a teaching program at the facility.

Rising out of World War II barracks, the hospital is currently one of five level-one trauma centers in LA County. The 72-acre facility is composed of an 8-story, 553-bed hospital, and a 52,000 square foot Primary Care and Diagnostic Center in addition to a complex of buildings, wooden barracks, and trailers.

 

 


OUR NEW CAMPUS

A new campus master plan outlining the future layout of the site was introduced in June 2012. Los Angeles County officials, who commissioned the plan, expect it to guide a series of construction projects over the next two decades.

The impetus for the improvements is a 2030 deadline to replace the existing hospital’s inpatient tower. Though it has been seismically retrofitted, state earthquake safety requirements demand that the 1960s-era building be replaced within 18 years.

County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas, whose 2nd District includes the hospital, said the $3 million spent on the plan was worthwhile – even though results will not be visible for years.

A 550-space staff parking structure was incorporated into the master plan’s first phase, along with two new buildings for Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. LA BioMed, as the research institute is known, is Harbor-UCLA’s anchor tenant, and 80 percent of its researchers also are doctors at the hospital.

LA BioMed President David Meyer said the research facility would be condensed from about 30 acres to an 11-acre compound on the southern portion of the campus. Once finished, it would be composed of three new four-story research buildings, a campus center with dining facilities, parking and new landscaping. LA BioMed renovations will precede hospital construction to provide as much campus parking throughout the construction phase as possible.

The first phase should be finished within four years, and will be followed by new outpatient medical offices along Carson Street two years later, said Perkins+Will Associate Principal Russ Triplett. By 2021, construction on all outpatient buildings and most of the parking lots and structures will be completed, planners said. Most support services in the current hospital will have been moved out by then as well.